Leadership Lessons from Father Guido Sarducci

Larry Tucker

Author: Larry Tucker

Executive Coaches of Orange County

www.ECofOC.org

If you are old enough to have watched “Saturday Night Live” in the early 80s, you may have laughed with Father Guido Sarducci, played by comedian Don Novello. One of his bits was about starting a school named Five Minute University where he would teach everything that the average college graduate would remember five years after graduating. So, for example, his whole economics course was “supply and demand”. That’s it. (Keep in mind…he is a comedian.)

Father Sarducci really didn’t offer a course on leadership, but if he wanted to start one, I have the perfect three thoughts for him. And, more seriously, I suggest that after all the books and articles written about leadership, keeping in mind three simple concepts might help focus your thoughts and actions as you lead your nonprofit.

Excellent leaders are grounded to three primary concepts:

Vision: Great leaders have researched and developed a strong vision about what direction the organization must take. All their decisions reflect this vision. As they prioritize their day, they make sure that their activities build toward jeux blackjack that vision.  

Values: Creating, refining and understanding an organization’s values are key leadership traits. An excellent values statement takes into account not only the values stated, but recognizes the implications of which values are not mentioned. For example, a values statement without some form of “teamwork” or “collaboration” implies an organization of individual contributors where success is defined by each person’s achievements.

Role Modeling: Once a great leader has developed a vision of where to take the organization and adopted the values defining how his/her daily actions will get there, then every one of the leader’s actions must reflect them. It’s not that easy!

My apologies to Father Guido Sarducci.

4 thoughts on “Leadership Lessons from Father Guido Sarducci

  1. Excellent thoughts. I have been associated with nonprofits for some time
    and what I find is that often there is a disconnect between leaders from the board and with the Executive Directors. Styles differ and cause questions.

  2. Excellent thoughts. I have been associated with nonprofits for some time
    and what I find is that often there is a disconnect between leaders from the board and with the Executive Directors. Styles differ and cause questions.

  3. I agree. Seems to me that many nonprofit board leaders don’t take the time (and often don’t have the time) to consider and address the underlying factors in board/Ed relationships, like leaderships styles, communications styles, skill strengths and weaknesses. Board members and EDs often take just enought time to work out the logisitical issues of running the nonprofit, but sometimes miss the larger picture.

  4. I agree. Seems to me that many nonprofit board leaders don’t take the time (and often don’t have the time) to consider and address the underlying factors in board/Ed relationships, like leaderships styles, communications styles, skill strengths and weaknesses. Board members and EDs often take just enought time to work out the logisitical issues of running the nonprofit, but sometimes miss the larger picture.

Comments are closed.