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Working Remotely…The Challenge To Teamwork

Adrianne Geiger Dumond

A recent study reported that 41% of non-profits hire staff/employees to work off-site.

The study is noted in an article published by Blue Avocado [1], which is actually a primer that all non-profits should read if they have people working remotely.

I will capture the essence of the primer, but really recommend studying the primer with those teams involved.

Clear roles, responsibilities, and accountability. Probably the best way to establish trust and respect is to have those involved meet long enough to review clear job responsibilities. It helps if each person understands the job duties of others, so work proceeds as expected. This also means distributing leadership effectively.

Participate in Constructive Conflict. All teams have times of disagreement or conflict. It can be harder to deal with if someone is working remotely. Handling conflict well means that team members meet, focus on the work being done and not on personal behavior or attacks. The challenge is how the disagreement affects the work output. Success is when those involved understand the challenge, resolve it, put it behind them and learn from the experience.

Consistently support one another. It isn’t always easy for a remotely working person to feel like an integral part of the team, or they may feel they are providing an extremely valuable service the team can’t appreciate – for example a data analysis expert, or fundraising staff, or marketing staff. As the article says, “Team members who adjust their work based on the needs of others are able to keep the work moving while empowering their teammates to do the best possible along the way.”

Consider team success vs. individual success. Being aware of the language team members use in emails, conversations and discussions can shape the feelings of being a team. If the “I” word is often used instead of “we”it makes a difference. This may be especially true for the remotely working member.  Another quote, “ Teams who focus more on giving credit rather than seeking it understand the exponential impact on the group as a whole.”

I strongly recommend this primer for sound guidance.


[1] blueavocado.org, Remote Team Environments: A How To Primer, Rachel Renock, May, 2019

Author: Adrianne Geiger DuMond, Executive Coaches of Orange County, www.ECofOC.org

Harassment

Robin Noah
Robin Noah

Is the issue of harassment confusing? Do you wish that a simple, clear statement was available to help you have a clearer understanding of what it is and how to deal with it? Here is a brief overview.

TYPES: There are several types of inappropriate behavior that constitute harassment. The behavior could be of a sexual nature may involve bullying or other unwelcome behavior. Employee harassment guidelines establish the standards of conduct employees must follow, as well as the employer’s responsibilities in the event of a harassment claim as well as the possible consequences for engaging in such behavior

GUIDELINES: Employee harassment guidelines are a set of rules that illustrate how employees should conduct themselves in the workplace. They are in place to inform workers of what constitutes inappropriate behavior. Employee harassment guidelines define harassment, establish a specific code of conduct and clearly describe the procedures for reporting harassment. Many employers require that workers sign a document saying they read and understand harassment guidelines to help ensure adherence to harassment policies and procedures.

ISSUES: A central issue is occupying the time of HR professionals is harassment in the workplace. The costs associated with this issue go far beyond the simple payment of legal fees. Affected employees may begin to display any number of negative indications of harassment: feeling victimized, having attendance problems, showing a decrease in productivity, experiencing a hostile work environment. Even a potential loss of employment for those involved may result. Because harassment in business exclusively involves people, it falls to HR departments to maintain vigilance in monitoring and addressing this issue.

Anti-discrimination laws also prohibit harassment against individuals in retaliation for filing a discrimination charge, testifying, or participating in any way in an investigation, proceeding, or lawsuit under these laws; or opposing employment practices that they reasonably believe discriminate against individuals, in violation of these laws.” You, as a business owner, are liable for the inappropriate behaviors that fall into this description.

The HR ROLE AND PREVENTION:

Federal laws: The prevalence of harassment in the workplace has led to a number of federal laws:

  • Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 (ADEA),
  • Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA).

Legal matters in the workplace tend to fall under human resources, a component of business with labor law at its core. A harassment lawsuit carries with it the power to destroy your business, so it is beneficial to have HR on hand to deter situations of harassment.

Human resources personnel are equipped to take several measures in prevention of harassment. When first hired your employees may not know what the boundaries of behavior involve. They must be informed, and receive training. After training, employees should sign written acknowledgements of the training. This document is placed in their personnel files.

IMPORTANCE: Training and documentation provide important support if litigating a harassment case ever becomes necessary. Your HR department needs to provide continued required “brush-up” training as a necessary reminder to employees about harassment issues and how to avoid them.

EMPLOYER RESPONSIBILITIES: Implementing an employee harassment policy does not release employers from liability if a worker is the victim of harassment. Employers must make a good-faith effort to prevent harassment in the workplace and remedy a harassment situation if a worker files a complaint. Employers are liable for harassment if they are made aware of harassing behavior and fail to take action to correct the situation.

Guidelines attempt to prevent harassment through education and training about the problems harassment causes and the individual responsibilities of all involved. The EEOC Training Institute is a valuable resource employers can use to implement training and technical assistance programs to improve employee awareness about harassment.

EMPLOYER LIABILITY: Despite having abuse and harassment policies in place:

  • Employers may be liable for the inappropriate behaviors of workers.
  • Employers are liable for harassment when a manager or supervisor’s inappropriate behavior results in an adverse employment action such as a decrease in wages or termination.
  • Employers who fail to prevent or at least make an attempt to prevent harassing behavior are also liable.
  • Employers who are made aware of harassing or abusive behavior and take the necessary steps to correct the situation are usually released from liability unless the victim can prove otherwise.

REFERENCE: Effective January, 2019 Gov. Code 12950.1 (Amended by SB 1343)  now requires that all employers of 5 or more employees provide 1 hour of sexual harassment and abusive conduct prevention training to non-managerial employees and 2 hours of sexual harassment and abusive conduct prevention training to managerial employees once every two years.

Education:  Educate yourself. It’s important that you know the fundamentals of harassment in work place.

This article is purely informational. For questions regarding the impact of harassment rules on your business, please see a labor law attorney.

Author: Robin Noah, Executive Coaches of Orange County, www.ECofOC.org

2020 Vision: 3 Conversations to Have About the Future Today

David Coffaro
David Coffaro

Strategy Imagine it’s New Year’s Eve 2020. It’s getting close to midnight and under your breath, you say to yourself “I can’t believe the year went by so fast!”

You have a few quiet moments by yourself before gathering with family and friends to join the countdown to 2021, and you reflect back on highlights of the year that’s quickly coming to a close. You mentally run through some of your personal highlights: family, vacation, social gatherings, exciting events. Then like most leaders, you roll through scenes from your work life that stand out.

As you think back over 2020, what are the top two or three highlights that come to mind? What were the greatest contributions your team made to the success of your organization? Which activities that your team intentionally engaged in had the greatest impact toward fulfilling the company’s vision?

Right now, thinking about the completion of a year that hasn’t yet begun may seem far off in the future. This is the time of year when leaders are fine-tuning their financial plans and budgets for 2020 and generally focused on the question “How will we make our numbers next year?” The numbers question is important; we have to deliver expected financial results.

But numbers in isolation are simply a reflection of what’s already happened. They quantify results of the activities we’ve already completed and how effectively we executed upon them. They are not a picture of what we want to make happen. That’s where the vision thing comes into the conversation.

2020 Vision

As you think about the impact your organization will make in 2020 beyond the financial results you plan to create, consider revisiting the vision. Even if your organization’s vision has been more cosmetic than actionable, this is the perfect time for your team to delve into three strategic questions that can shape accomplishments in the upcoming year. These are three conversations about tomorrow for today:

Conversation No. 1

How well do our actions align with our company’s vision? This conversation requires a candid self-assessment of the vision to make sure it’s real and the team owns it. If there’s any doubt about true buy-in to the vision, an early strategic priority leading into 2020 is to invest leadership team time into redefining where you’re going. Vision sets an organization’s course and informs activities. 

What do we do (mission), why do we do it (purpose), and how do we fulfill our mission (strategy) are essential questions an organization must answer in order to define its place in the world. Taken together, the answers define an organization’s vision.

Conversation No. 2

What are the most important two or three strategic priorities we want to deliver beyond the expected financial results in 2020? With your vision as the guide, this conversation informs specific areas of impact your team will focus upon beginning now. Vision is irrelevant unless it informs priorities and those priorities define actions.

This conversation takes a deductive “if, then” approach: “if our No. 1 priority is acquiring and developing new talent, then we will _________”.  This conversation also leads to rich self-assessment of previously stated strategic priorities. If a team said their No. 1 priority last year was acquiring and developing talent, yet no specific actions were taken, it wasn’t really a priority.

Conversation No. 3

What are the areas in our organization we should be looking at for self-disruption? During the late 1990s tech boom, the concept of disruption grabbed the attention of the business world. New entrants in a market gave birth to novel ways of serving customers, gained share and changed industries. While disruption has become a core strategy, today the question is “where are there opportunities to self-disrupt?” 

This conversation invites your team to temporarily step outside their roles, look at the organization from a third-party observer perspective and ask the question “if we were starting this business from scratch today, how would we do it?” It requires temporarily letting go of legacy constraints and look at your operation the way a potential disruptor would see things, then challenge your organization to initiate self-disruption.

One of the greatest responsibilities we hold as leaders is driving continual evolution of the organization toward a well-defined future state. Today is the right day to begin these conversations about the 2020 vision your team wants to create. Today you can write scenes of the story you’ll look back to with great fulfillment on New Year’s Eve 2020.

Author: David Coffaro, Executive Coaches of Orange County, www.ECofOC.org

Book Review: “Dare to Lead” by Brene Brown

Michael Kogutek, nonprofit management coach
Michael Kogutek

This book review is on “Dare to Lead” by Brene Brown and published by Penguin-Random House (2018). Brene Brown is one of my favorite authors on leadership. She is a social worker and researcher at the University of Houston.

Her TED Talks on Vulnerability is amazing. Her recent work “Dare to Lead” is one of my top favorite leadership books of 2018. She explains why true leadership is about vulnerability and connection-not power and strength.

Brown describes the four skills needed to become a courageous leader. These skill sets are 100% teachable, observable and measurable.The first and most important skill is Rumbling with Vulnerability. Brown had assumed that the biggest barrier to courageous leadership would be fear, but her research indicated that fear is not a barrier. In fact, leaders she interviewed admitted to being fearful much of the time. The real barrier is how people armor themselves to deal with the fear. It is critical to understand that we all self-protect when we feel scared, defensive, or vulnerable.

A great tool to use when Rumbling with Vulnerability is curiosity. “When I find myself in a tough situation or I’m about to receive some hard feedback, instead of getting my armor up, I stay open and ask questions, so I can get specific information,” Brown explains. In the book she identifies 16 different ways we armor ourselves and offers ways to move that armor out of the way to become a daring, courageous leader.

The second skill is Living into Your Values. Leaders constantly must do tough things, give hard feedback, put bold ideas into motion while being unsure of the outcome, and take many risks. Courageous leaders are able to do this consistently because they operate with a clear set of values and behaviors that line up with those values. “It is important to have values as a leader, but it is critical to operationalize them. Otherwise they are just vague concepts, not guiding principles,” Brown explains.

The third skill, Braving Trust, can be tricky because many leaders don’t know how to talk about trust. Direct reports have to trust their leaders in order to have honest conversations and both parties have to be in an unarmored position. It’s no secret that the highest performing teams are built on a foundation of trust. And building trust is a skill that can be taught and learned.

The fourth skill is Learning to Rise and deals with the ability to re-set after an error or mistake. The ability to be resilient helps leaders learn from mistakes quickly, share those learnings, and continue to move forward in a positive way. And, yes, it is a skill that every leader can learn.

“Courage is a skill set we can teach, measure, and observe, but we are choosing not to because it is an investment of energy and time and it takes muscle building. But why are we choosing not to do it? If we need braver leaders, but we’re not investing in skilling them up, what is getting in the way?” asked Brown.

“Dare to Lead” is the ultimate playbook that offers practical skill-building tools for creating brave leaders in your organization. You will not be disappointed.  (Chad Gordon-BleacherLeaderChat)

Author: Michael Kogutek, Executive Coaches of Orange County, www.ECofOC.org

Volunteering/Volunteer Recruitment Made Easy for Students and Nonprofits

Monica Horner
Monica Horner

Recently, our coaches learned about an exciting new student volunteer project and transcript service called VolunteerCrowd. CEO and Founder, Amy von Kaenel introduced her latest development designed to help middle school through college-age students find, schedule and track volunteer opportunities for FREE!

Students are able to uncover meaningful opportunities ranging from a few hours volunteering at a local shelter to a summer-long internship. The best part is students are able to match their interests and volunteer needs with a project in their community.

Volunteering is one of four critical factors when applying for admission to college. Recently, VolunteerCrowd looked at 79 Orange County public high schools and found there are approximately 54,000 students from schools who require volunteer hours in search of over 460,000 collective hours in a given year.  The need for volunteer projects is great. Each year, students find it more and more difficult to differentiate themselves when competing against students who have equally as high GPAs and perfect test scores. With the new app, VolunteerCrowd makes student volunteering easy and transparent.

Volunteering can make a unique contribution to college and career success that can’t be taught in the classroom.  Evidence supports that social-emotional education is falling short of preparing students for higher education and employment.  A 2018 Bloomberg Next Study reported that many graduates have deficient skills in emotional intelligence, complex reasoning and negotiation, and persuasion. VolunteerCrowd can deliver the relevant opportunities students need to learn and practice soft skills and positively impact college completion rates and workforce success.

On the flip side, nonprofits can take advantage of the ease and convenience of VolunteerCrowd’s recruitment process by sending projects to students@volunteercrowd.com, and later this year posting volunteer opportunities on VolunteerCrowd. Students are carefully matched with projects they are passionate about. VolunteerCrowd will notify students when a match is made. Project details will be shared with students and reminders will be automatically sent. Once a project is completed, nonprofits can verify hours.  Later this year, organizations will be able to acknowledge a job well done by providing strength and skill endorsements related to student performance thus providing individual assessments that colleges like to see.

Below are some of the many ways VolunteerCrowd assists nonprofits with volunteer engagement throughout the year and helps students meet their community service goals:

  • Find volunteer organizations of personal interest. Request an alert when new projects become available.
  • Search for/post volunteer projects by location and zip code.
  • Receive reminders, request projects and get alerts when new organizations post projects
  • Allow students to qualify for the President’s Volunteer Service Award.  VolunteerCrowd became a certifying organization in July.
  • Engage volunteers in meaningful experiences they can become passionate about.
  • Invite friends to join the cause and volunteer together.
  • Review your community service experiences and develop leadership skills through projects.
  • Let your performance stand out by requesting recommendations from organizations you serve.

Later this fall, VolunteerCrowd will unveil their volunteer transcript and portfolio service allowing students to create an individual portfolio showcasing total hours by cause, top organizations served, milestones and even recommendations.

To learn more, go to www.volunteercrowd.com or download the app at the App Store.

Author: Monica Horner, Executive Coaches of Orange County, www.ECofOC.org

Performance Review for the CEO/ED

Adrianne Geiger Dumond

A performance review of the CEO/ED (Executive Director) one time a year is recommended as good governance. Yet, when I have asked some of these leaders in the past, the answer often is “ Oh, I’ve never had one” … or “I had one several years ago.”

The questions are, How can a leader grow and reach new heights without support and feedback from the Board? How can a Board really support a mission without understanding the leader’s challenges and strengths?

There are assessment tools and even resources on the Internet about this process and protocol, but I believe the simplest of discussions with everyone notified and involved produces the healthiest and most satisfactory outcomes.

• The Board chair meets with the CEO/ED to state purpose, ask about a future date, and ask if there are any items he/she would like feedback on.

• The Board chair reports to the Board the findings and sets a future date, asking that all members please attend.

In the meeting there are two (2) simple questions to answer:

1. What did the leader accomplish this year, what about effective communication with the Board, with donor and community relationships, success with leadership initiatives, and meeting the strategic goals of the nonprofit? What are his/her strengths?

2. What would the Board like to have him/her consider doing differently?

These questions should be tackled separately. That is, question 1 should be discussed by the entire Board – if small, in one group. If the Board is more than 6, then in small groups, and then each small group reports to the others. There is knowledge and information shared in this process that makes the Board a stronger team.

After there is closure to the first question, the second question is addressed in the same way.

The discussions and notes from these two sessions must be confidential and housed in the Board chair’s possession – never in the office. Feedback to the CEO/ED should convey support, appreciation, and should also touch on any development goals for the leader.

Author: Adrianne Geiger DuMond, Executive Coaches of Orange County, www.ECofOC.org

Does Your Organization Have Committed Owners or Disengaged Renters?

Namita Kutty

Does your non-profit have owners who view the business as their own and go over and beyond their job description or renters who just get by viewing the job as a regular 9-5 chore?

Who are your Owners, Renters and Vandals?

According to a recent Gallup poll, only 33% of workers in the United States are really engaged in their jobs which means they bring their full self to work and are Owners.

51% of employees are disengaged Renters and bring themselves and their skills to work but may not really put in their full heart into it.  Vital to your organization, but they are there for money and view it as a 9-5 job. A more concerning note is that 16% are actively disengaged and alarmingly a small portion of them might even end up as up as Vandals as per Cueinc*. Vandals are employees who don’t just not care about your organization but may also derail it and your other engaged team members with their negativity and personal agendas.

Does it matter if employees are engaged?
Here are some metrics from Gallup on the difference that engaged employees make :

Highly engaged business units:

  • Realize a 41% reduction in absenteeism and a 17% increase in productivity
  • Achieve a 10% increase in customer metrics and a 20% increase in sales.
  • Overall, it can result in 21% greater profitability

First, how do you identify a highly engaged employee ?

An engaged employee doesn’t just view it as a job or a gig. They will go over and beyond the job description to work towards the mission of the non-profit. She not just believes in the mission, but is an evangelist ! Example : An employee works in a hotel and as he is walking down the corridor, he spots an piece of paper on the floor. Will he pick it up and throw it in a bin, or kick it under the carpet or will he throw something else down and walk away?

Five quick tips on increasing engagement and having more owners :

1. Invest in what motivates individual employees :

Employees feel most engaged when they feel cared for. So, your first step is to identify what motivates an individual employee. And then cater to them by developing individual development plan & reward for each of them.

2. Help them grow:

Radical Candour by Kim Scott shares a great way to give feedback by caring personally but challenging directly. Which means giving direct feedback while also building a personal connect and rapport with the employee thereby giving guidance that’s kind and clear, specific and sincere.

3. Help your employees shine :

Employees are most engaged when they enjoy their jobs. An efficient way to do this, is to  play by their strengths. Identify what they are best at and ensure that they have opportunities to shine by they doing what comes naturally to them.

4. Freedom to make big changes :

A renter can change the drapes, but can’t break down walls can she? A owner can. Give your employees the freedom to make big calls and have them take the accountability for it.

5. Rewarding & Celebrating your owners :

Do the promotion and big increments only go to your renters who have been there forever or do you proactively identify your upcoming owners and reward them?

Wishing you all the very best in your quest to increase your business owners and weed out the vandals ! Au revior.

Source :

Community for Positive Employee Relations – http://www.cueinc.com/ Gallup – https://news.gallup.com/reports/199961/7.aspx                    
Radical Candour by Kim Scott   https://www.kimmalonescott.com/

Author: Namita Kutty, Executive Coaches of Orange County, www.ECofOC.org

Working Remotely

Robin Noah
Robin Noah
The option to work outside the office is a dream come true for employees who want better working options, however, managing remote employees can quickly become a boss’s worst nightmare. Remote working, telecommuting, flexible working – thanks to the wonders of technology, is increasingly finding new ways to get the job done. The ability to telecommute, whether full time or on occasion, has become an increasingly common workplace perk. In fact, according to one Gallup study 43.

It has been said that allowing people to work from home attracts and retains top talent in a competitive market, but there are factors to consider.

1. Eligibility: One of the first things any employer needs to consider when deciding on a remote work assignment is whether the employees’ attitudes, work ethics and personalities align with the company’s expectations of telecommuting. Managers should accommodate on a case-by-case basis keeping in mind what’s best for the company, its team members and the project at hand.  Sometimes looking at the employees profile will give the best clue when looking for candidates or responding to a request.

Take some time  to cover all areas of remote working and create a job description that includes the nature of the position, how long a person has been at the position, past job performance and how frequently a staff member can telecommute, i.e., full time, once a week, etc.

2. Expectations:  For geographically dispersed teams, or in cases where remote work helps, accommodation for family schedules and obligations, official “business hours” may vary from person to person.  However, regardless of their work hours, employees also need to be held accountable for their assigned jobs. “It is important to provide very specific remote work guidelines and policies for employees to review and acknowledge in a telecommuting arrangement.

Workers who do not meet these expectations risk losing the trust of leadership and sidelining their team. Minimum considerations:

  • Clear expectations with employees
  • Adhering to company expectations
  • Available during office hours
  • Meet deadlines and complete projects with excellence
  • Maintain communication with their manager and co-workers.

Other concerns that may be addressed

  • Security of company owned equipment
  • Accountability and visibility
  • Security – both physical, and digital
  • Maintaining boundaries between work life and home life

3. Equipment and Cybersecurity

Enabling employees to work remotely opens up the likelihood that they’ll use their work devices to communicate via unsecured public networks. Password-protect all business devices; make sure that data going out from those devices is encrypted. Keep a current inventory of all devices and make sure each one has its GPS tracking turned on. Additionally, install technology to remotely wipe data from any device that has been lost or stolen.”

4. Communication methods: With the appropriate use of communications technology, companies can also ensure their culture remains intact, even with full-time telecommuters.  It’s wise to explicitly state that remote work is a privilege that can be revoked if it’s discovered that an employee is not meeting his or her expectations while working outside the office.

This article is informational. Please see a labor law attorney for any questions you may have.

Author: Robin Noah, Executive Coaches of Orange County, www.ECofOC.org

How Valuable Is Time To Your Employees?

Dave Blankenhorn

As our day to day lives have become busier and technology has eroded the line between work hours and personal time, many people are working longer hours than ever before. From cell phones to laptops people are now accessible at virtually any hour of the day. The result is that people feel stressed and lack more free time.

When it comes to work, it turns out that giving people more freedom can foster greater productivity and creativity among employees. This can include such things as more vacation time or short breaks within the workday. Companies such as Netflix have gone so far to introduce vacation policies allowing people to take off whatever time they need. Interestingly, these companies have found most do not abuse such freedom and tend to be happier and perhaps more loyal. At the least companies should encourage people to use all of their allotted vacation time.

Another way to give employees more time is to allow them some flexibility to run the occasional errand during the workday. Some find it hard to juggle everything they need to do on the weekends.

For people who run on “auto pilot” when it comes to repetitive tasks or routines mixing things up can have a big impact. It forces them to become more engaged in what else is around them.

In our rat race world finding ways to ease the stress on our staff can pay big dividends.

Author: Dave Blankenhorn, Executive Coaches of Orange County, www.ECofOC.org

Changing Pies

David Coffaro
Dave Coffaro

As nonprofit development professionals know, there are many factors that influence charitable donations. Emotional connection to an organization’s mission, commitment to creating a better community, giving back to a charity that made a difference in someone’s life or tax deductions can all be influencers. Add to these internal motivations the external reality of economic conditions and you have an ever-changing environment informing development strategies.

Strategy as a Process, not an Event

Successful leaders know that their ability to adapt strategy as environments change is fundamental to sustaining a thriving organization. Reading the environment, interpreting temporary and longer-term structural changes and proactively adjusting approach are critical determinants of success.

Today, nonprofit leaders face an environmental shift in terms of fundraising. New preliminary IRS information, reported by MarketWatch this week (https://www.marketwatch.com/story/americans-slashed-their-charitable-deductions-by-54-billion-after-trumps-tax-overhaul-2019-07-09) indicates that as a result of the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, taxpayers have itemized $54 billion less in charitable contributions so far this tax season compared to the previous year. These numbers could change as the IRS receives more tax returns (the agency expects a record 14.6 million tax return extension requests this year), but the headline corroborates what many nonprofits have been feeling over the past year of fundraising.

At first blush, this news suggests that nonprofits must now compete for a smaller pie of charitable giving. However, when we dig a little deeper, it may be that there are other pies available to get a bigger slice. Here are three specific ideas to contemplate as your organization considers refining and adapting its’ strategy:

  • Market the mission – Step into the shoes of the donor and ask “why would I contribute to your organization”. Tax benefits are one reason, but for most of your donors, there is some kind of emotional connection to your mission. The work your organization does every day resonates with the donor at some level, or they wouldn’t be one of your donors. This is a perfect time to revisit your mission, how you articulate it, your organization’s value proposition and how you message all of this through every medium to make sure the story is communicated the way it needs to be delivered.
  • Increase focus on corporations and foundations – Concurrent with the 1/1% decline in the dollar amount of donations from individuals, funds from corporations and foundations actually  increased (+5.4% from corporations and +7.3% from foundations). Translation – there’s still a lot of pie available; you just may have to look in different places to get what your organization needs. This is where the role of leaders comes into play in terms of refining strategy based on a changing environment.
  • Explore non-financial gifts – Beyond the 2017 tax law changes, one theory suggests that equity market volatility over the past year may be playing a role in individual giving. This behavioral finance explanation suggests that when capital markets are volatile, investors feel less confident, therefore more cautious about donating from their investment portfolios to charities. As an alternative, developing or expanding your organization’s focus on non-financial gifts – real estate, automobiles, oil, gas or mineral rights, specialty assets or artwork may be a way to enable your donors to support the mission in a manner that is more comfortable in the current market cycle.

Effective nonprofit strategy is on ongoing, dynamic process that continually recalibrates to its environment. This is a perfect time to revisit your organization’s strategy to see how it aligns with current reality, and the pies that are available to you.

Author: David Coffaro, Executive Coaches of Orange County, www.ECofOC.org